Make shift Indian cuisine

It is almost impossible to find decent Indian (or Mediterranean) food in Illinois, outside of Chicago, that is.

Because of that, what little bit that Julie has been exposed to, she didn’t care for.

One of the few saving graces of Houston, however, is the abundance of different ethnic restaurants. Mexican, Korean, German, Indian. You name it, they’ve got it.

Today we ate lunch at Chili’s. Just another typical chain. A decent “go to” place when you really don’t know what you want. I ordered the chicken pasta and she ordered a sampler platter. As we shared lunch off of each other’s plates, I mentioned how I hadn’t had Indian in a while and we should do that tonight.

Needless to say, she turned up her nose and professed her dislike of all things curry.

Oh my God. Is this going to be our deal breaker?? Is my love and adventure for food going to clash with her meat and potatoes palate?

After a little poking and prodding, I discovered the reason behind her dislike. “It’s too much tomato sauce”

Huh??

Anyone who has ever had good Indian food can tell you that it should, in no way shape or form, be comparable to “tomato sauce”!!

So… After a brief pleading and a compromise, I have convinced Julie to let me fix Chicken tiki masala tonight. The compromise? I’ll leave the sauce off some of the chicken just in case.

I spent the better part of the afternoon trying to hunt down a grocery store that sells all the ingredients I need. Finally, with my bag in tow, I stopped at the only “Mediterranean” restaurant and bought several pieces of naan. Not only could I not find any, I have no time or knowledge to make it.

Anyways, as I was waiting for them to fix my naan, I asked the server why someone would refer to their food as “tomato sauce”?

Her response? “The owner thinks the Americans will think it’s too spicy so he doesn’t put much spice in it.”

Well, there’s an answer for me.

So, Julie will be home shortly, I have naan (which is actually pretty good), the masala sauce simmering, the rice in the cooker, and the chicken ready to go in the skillet.

Hopefully, the fact that I’m not shy with my cumin makes this worthy of a her trying real Indian food sometime.

Disclaimer; I realize that chicken tiki masala is not an “Indian” dish but I can make it fairly well, and it’s close enough.

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2 thoughts on “Make shift Indian cuisine

  1. We all make compromises. Donna won’t go out for Chinese food because it is “covered in glop.” However, she is happy to eat Thai food (or Malaysian). Go figure.
    Maybe Julie would like Biryani or Saag Paneer.

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